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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of capacity and given the macro environment, given the cannibalization that tablets are doing with the expensive notebooks and the road map that is questionable. >> is there a road map that you see that gets them into the tablet and mobile space in a better way? you look at what is happening to the stock of arm, look at the stock of qualcomm, and these guys are nowhere in the same arena. >> that's a good question. they have the road map to get in. will they have a position of dominance? being the same is not going to be enough, particularly given a lot of oems over many, many years being accustom to them being basically sole source or a dominant proprietary source when you have an alternative where you have a multi source solution, some suppliers that use their processing from a company called arm. so it's going to be very tough. you have to have significant advances for oems to use your product. i don't think they that. >> what does this say about hue yet pack yard? what does this say about the news about dell with a potential buyout? i assume what is happening at intel is ha
to improved market environment. which shows a lot of promise if uncertainty is removed. take a listen. >> $90 billion is sitting there waiting to get into the market. if we see confidence coming through from the political sector, the global economic recovery, this thing has legs. >> guys, barring what they called a terrible quarter in commodities, a lot of things working in their favor. margin goals being met, all that. >> i want to talk about something that david faber said, came on air and said the different stories, there was a lot of chatter on the web, they said the company was in big trouble. you said they were dead wrong. i almost gave him credence on air. i apologized to mr. gorman about that. that was a very good call. you knew that there were rumor amongers that were spreading things that weren't true. >> we were in the mid stl of the european crisis, we're certainly not in the midst of the same crisis. any exposure you had to the sovereigns were seized on. morgan was suffering from that. that was a while back already. >> how did you know it was okay? >> how did i know? >> yeah, how
growth a growth that is actually compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. now, what does that mean for us? i remind you that in 2013 the imf is certainly stronger, better equipped financially, has certainly refined some of its analytical tools. we will continue to strengthen our surveyance, peps on spillover -- especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training, technical assistance. in other words, we are not only serving the needs of a selected group of countries, but we serve the entire membership. and when you look at the map of the world and see where our teams are whether it's in capacity building, in technical assistance, in programs associated or not with financing, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and yet not completed reform of quota and governance which, as you know, includes three stages, two of which are completed, the third one not yet. and cer
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
senator schumer said there is still a pretty tense environment here in washington and imm after the inaugural ceremonies up here on the platform, they go inside for the traditional inaugural luncheon where the president, speaker boehner and majority harry reid will be sitting down at the same table and wonder what that environment is like. i asked former bush white house chief of staff andy card about that remembering back to 2001 after that controversial election, and what the environment was there, here is what he told me. >> i suspect it will probably be a lot like the atmosphere that george w. bush experienced in his first term of office, it was a little bit chilly and cold, but at the same time, you can't help, but be wrapped up in the excitement of an inauguration. >> reporter: of course, that's what this really is about. celebrating american democracy on monday, tomorrow, the big question, what will the environment be like on tuesday morning, alisyn. >> alisyn: well, that's absolutely right. there is a lot of environment, john. thanks for showcasing that for us and we ca
, tighter inventory levels number two, and a stable price environment. although the overall economy in the backdrop remains sluggish, we think housing is a bright spot. ashley: one of the critical issues we talk about is the availability of mortgages. do you think we will see a turnaround? we will not go to the mortgage for everyone policy of the olden days, but will we go back to what is considered somewhat normal standard, because they're pretty strict right now. >> that is a great question. it is uncertainty on the political front at washington, d.c., and the status of mortgage reform which is definitely an impediment toward the recovery. but our overall view is that it is so important to get housing back on track and heal the economy that it won't do a thing from a political standpoint to prevent greater accessibility of credit. we are not going back to the good old days, that is something that will not happen. ashley: learned the lesson the hard way. for the home building sector, which stocks do you find particularly attractive right now? >> our best in class are looking for a
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
unemployment rate, none of which reflect a good economic environment. our goal is to have economic growth and create jobs. that's what we were elected to do. bill: we've seen in other states, florida for years, texas as well. what you would do is you would tax things that are currently not being taxed by the state, such as certain legal fees, accounting fees, spa services, and food. ultimately what would you get out of it? >> well, you have to look at some serious points. consumption-based sales and use tax very broad based on both goods and service efs is s is a very good economic driver as compared to the negative effect of income taxes which is a detriment to economic growth and jobs. what we believe is to expand the sales tax basin to goods and services, that is something that would absolutely create business activity, and therefore income and gdp growth and with that we were going to get rid of completely the negative taxes, which would be income taxes, both personal and corporate, and what that does is it will create jobs. bill: okay, now we -- i know you believe it's got a pretty g
clear, natul sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric can do for you. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. charles: if you think your student loans are bad, china will now drop 250 billion dollars a year to send kids, millions of them, to universities. the goal is to have 195 million chinese college grads by the year 2020. but with the slowing economy, it seems they are going to have a whole lot of kids on their hands with big expectations and little opportunity. sounds familiar. let's get back to the markets. it's been a great year of the great migration, and what th
of educational environment to include vocational training. it's been very successful. >>brian: general, what can the government do? specifically, where would the funds go? >> the funds really, we're not looking for that many public dollars. it only costs $3,500 per veteran per year to put them through this program. we have thousands of wounded warrior programs throughout the country. we think there needs to be a public-private partnership in reintegrating these veterans back into our communities. what we would like to happen is to, for the government to advertise our model and that it be adopted and adapted to the local communities. they figure out with veterans organizations and others on how to make it work inside their communities. we'll work with them very closely. >>brian: do you have a site people can go? >> nod.org. our chairman governor tom ridge is taupe talk to anyone any time about this program. >>brian: thank you for your service, what you did especially in afghanistan leading that invasion. lieutenant haggenbeck, thank you for joining us. next, if criminals want guns we'll get one.
to help 8000 schools to train teachers and staff to create safer environments. when it comes to mental health, more money, provided $55 million for new initiative to make sure students get mental treatment. $25 million for state base strategies supporting individuals age 16-25 with mental health or substance abuse issues. another $25 million to offer students mental-health services for trauma or anxiety. $50 million to train 5000 additional mental health professionals serving children and young adults. those are the items the washington post as identified that congressional action would be necessary. as we go throughout the morning, a lot of editorials from this morning's papers. we were reports of those as well. we take your calls and get your thoughts, jeff is a gun owner from missouri. thank you for holding. go ahead. caller: the sun is just coming up here, and it has been up for you a little bit. i wanted to address the. a lot of people -- the point a lot of people forget. the second amendment was put into place to protect people from being observed by a corrupt government. if we d
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
: not on share part. they take advantage of the environment put out there. >> not some brilliant business acumen going into this. that being said, jamie dimon run as very profitable bank. if you think about it, put london whale in perspective. i have never been a very big story. people screwing up and going nuts afterwards. lori: we're informed nonetheless. thank you. melissa: charlie, thanks so much. the dawn of the ice age, what will the intercontinental exchange deal for euro nyse be for trading? lori: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's term set to expire next year. speculation is mounting who could take over. lou dobbs narrows the field for us next. ♪ . [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him twongs -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll wk his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and me from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his la, which
by a more balanced growth, growth that is more compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. what does the need for us? i remind you that, in 2013, the imf is stronger, better equipped financially. it has certainly refined some of its tools. we'll continue to strengthen our surveillance, especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training and technical assistance. in other words, we're not only serving the needs of a selected group of companies -- a group of countries, but the entire membership. when you look at the world and see where our teams are, where there is building and technical assistance in programs, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and not complete reform of " and governance. we are in three stages, two are completed. we are certainly short of a few members, one of which is obviously a key member. that is all everyone into open bar conference with. i w
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)